GUIDED ALASKA Rafting

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Alaska rafting trips in the Gates of the Arctic National Park and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge allow you to take in great sweeps of the Alaska wilderness with relative ease. From the Kongakut River to the Charley River, Arctic Wild has the perfect Alaska rafting trip for you.

What to Expect from Our Rafting Trips
On our Brooks Range rafting trips we generally use 12 foot-long paddle-rafts. Each raft includes an Arctic Wild guide and either two or three paddlers. We plan our Alaska rafting trips for maximum wildlife viewing and scenery.

Generally our river trips are better suited for those seeking a wilderness experience rather than an adrenaline rush. If you are looking for an Alaska whitewater rafting trip,with Class II or Class III rapids, consider the Hulahula, or the Charley River trips.

On “travel days”, everyone works as a team to load and unload the rafts and maneuver safely down the river. Paddle-rafts allow every passenger to be actively involved in navigating and rafting the river. Some days may have challenging whitewater rafting but there is always ample time allowed for leisurely picnic lunches and exploration. Our Alaska rafting trips frequently include one, two, or three layover days, spent hiking, relaxing, or both.

How to Prepare for Alaska Rafting
No experience or training is necessary to enjoy an Alaska rafting trip, though being in decent shape physically will increase your enjoyment of the experience. Whether preparing for a float down the Kongakut River or one of our whitewater rafting adventures, we will provide you with advice on personal equipment, reading lists or anything else you need to make your Alaska adventure safe and fun.

Hulahula Whitewater Rafting

The Hulahula is an elemental river.  We begin our 90-mile paddle in the Hulahula’s headwaters, where the river is narrow and swift. 9,000-foot peaks tower over the tundra valley and a sense of adventure fills the air. From this dramatic start the river races towards the sea, showing us steep canyons, peaceful meadows, ice fields, wildlife and much more.

This trip combines with our High Peaks Backpack. Discounts apply.

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DATES

June 12, 2015 - June 22, 2015
region

REGION

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Trips
price

TRIP COST

$5,000

TRIP DETAILS

Our Hulahula raft trip traverses the great diversity of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Starting near the high peaks of the Brooks Range and ending at the cold arctic sea. There is no better way to experience the grandeur of the region.  We start with several days paddling and hiking in the mountains, then paddle the canyon’s Class III rapids, before spilling into the foothills.  Two more days of nonstop Class II rapids take us to the coastal plain, a wilderness region unlike any other—with stunning views and superb camping.  Then we continue on through the river’s delta to the Arctic Ocean, where we make our last night’s camp on a gravel island next to the Arctic sea-ice.

The beauty of this trip is in the diversity of landscapes and wildlife. High in the mountains Dall sheep dot the mountain-sides and bears dig roots on the river flats. In the foothills we often see wolves hunting marmots or following caribou trails. The coastal plain is where we may see musk oxen and we will keep our eyes peeled for arctic fox as we approach the coast. On this trip, we also have good chances of seeing peregrine falcons, golden eagles, jaegers, plovers, and a great variety of other migratory birds.

Hiking in the mountains and on the tundra is excellent.  Our travel schedule allows three layover days to hike the country, and plenty of free time each day.  No experience is required for paddle rafting, as instruction is provided. Everyone joins in the fun of paddling the boats under the guidance of a raft captain. Everyone will be busy and engaged on this small rock studded river. There are no “passengers” in our rafts.

 Summer travel in the arctic can be rigorous and participants should be ready for anything, including low water levels that require us to get out of the boats and drag them over shallow spots.  A half-mile portage is typical at the end of this trip. The hiking opportunities are limitless; from easy ambles up the valley, to all day peak ascents. Day-hikes will be tailored to your interests and abilities.

 On a wilderness trip like the Hulahula, one never knows what conditions we may face nor what opportunities might arise. This is the nature, and the honor, of wilderness travel.

ITINERARY

What follows is a general flow of events. Expect the unexpected and prepare to be flexible.

June 11:

Pre-trip meeting with your guide(s) in Fairbanks.

 

June 12:

Fly north from Fairbanks across the Yukon River, the Arctic Circle, and the Brooks Range, to the headwaters of the Hulahula River.  We’ll make a comfortable camp, have a good dinner, and watch the sun refuse to set!  Welcome to the arctic!  We can climb a small hill for a lovely view of the valley ahead.

 

June 13 - 21:

We’ll paddle and hike our way down the Hulahula River, allowing for three layover days for hiking and exploring.  We’ll take a layover in the mountains, another on the coastal plain, and another on the river’s delta en route to the Arctic Ocean.

June 22:

Awake this morning at the northern edge of the continent.  Weather permitting, we get a quick ride to the Eskimo Village of Kaktovik and then fly back south across the Brooks Range, the Arctic Circle, and the Yukon River to Fairbanks.  Time to change your socks!

WHAT'S INCLUDED

Transportation beyond Fairbanks, food while in the wilderness, stoves, cooking & eating utensils, boats, paddles, life jackets, safety & repair gear and professional guide service.

WHAT'S NOT INCLUDED

Lodging, non-camp meals, personal clothing and gear, waterproof river bag, fishing gear, and fishing license. Gratuity for guide(s). Rental equipment is available through Arctic Wild. See full equipment list.

(Please note that if you are unable to depart Kaktovik on the last day of the trip as scheduled, you will need to get yourself meals and a hotel in Kaktovik. This is not included in the trip price.)

WEATHER & BUGS

Temperatures vary dramatically in the Arctic and can range from the 20s to 70s.  When the wind comes from the north, the temperature can drop to below freezing. Cold rains and snow are possible, but we get lots of sunny weather this time of the year.  This trip happens during mosquito season, though bugs are made more bearable by cool, coastal breezes as we near the coast.  Bring along a mosquito head net and a small bottle of DEET repellent.

RECOMMENDED READING

Land of Extremes, Alex Huryn; Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska Geographic; Midnight Wilderness, Debbie Miller; Being Caribou, Karsten Heuer. More Alaska reading is available from our Bookstore.